19 June 2008

Life in The Villages: "active, vibrant and very wholesome" (A reader's email and my response!)

Mr. Blechman,

Your book seems to point out and emphasize the sleaziness of some people. these people would behave this way anywhere they live. I wish you would have spoken to the typical Village resident. They are enjoying life by participating in good healthful activities: golf, shuffleboard, pickeball, cards, mah jongg, etc. making good friends and doing lunch or dinner with them is a major part of life. It is truly a life that can only be compared to life on a vacation resort!

It is an active, vibrant and very wholesome lifestyle for MOST people!!!

KLS
A Village resident for one year!
---------------------------------

Kathy,

Did your copy of the book not include the part about my low key neighbors, Sassy the clown, the hospice volunteer, Ellen and her friends who play cards ("hand and foot") together, the clean cut Boomer club members, the friendly folks at the wine club, or Sheldon's Stompers? If not, then I'd ask for your money back.

As for Mr. Midnight, I like how he challenged stereotypes of older people. I don't think he's sleazy.

I hope you enjoy your retirement and your time in The Villages. There are certainly many good people down there to share it with.

Best Wishes,

Andrew

PS: If you want to keep your emails anonymous ("KLS") then you'll need to adjust the way your name appears in the address bar.

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

I haven't read the book yet - I heard the interview on "Here and Now" and was very interested. But now that I've seen your website and your (to borrow a phrase from the Cartalk guys) shameless commerce division, I'm turned off. I thought this was social commentary. I thought it might begin a dialogue about how we live and work intergenerationally in America. I can see why seniors want to form communities for themselves; I also regret the loss of their presence in our towns and neighborhoods. I don't see how "Leisuretown Wear" helps in this dialogue. No wonder your friends with whom you stayed at The Villages find it difficult, now, to support your motives.

About the author: said...

I'm not sure why humorous "LeisureWear" should be a problem. T-Shirts can help start debates, too. How about this one:

"My Grandparents seceded from society and all I got was this lousy T-shirt"

My motives are to start a debate, and I'm even selling the T-shirts at cost. Where's the issue? Should everyone else in the world be able to market themselves except poorly paid and idealistic authors?

-- ADB